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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
-800-743-cnbc. maybe it just doesn't matter, maybe the stock market stays buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff buoyant because the fiscal cliff is not that big of an issue. maybe that's why the averages once again refuse to drop dramatically, the dow falling 60 points. despite the obvious impasse i saw firsthand when i appeared on "meet the press" with david gregory this weekend, i know i've been interpreting the market's relative success through a difficult period. success is defined by no huge hammering like we had during the debt ceiling crisis as a sign that either perhaps people didn't understand what awaits them -- no no! or that there might be a deal on the horizon to avoid the fiscal cliff, the fact that the republicans put out an offer, like their old offer before the president won re-election, it does feel like the two sides are talking, but they appear to be talking past each other. the clock is really ticking in washing
on vacation without the notion. the fiscal cliff glasgows from being half full to half empty that's where we want it, and once it's half empty, it's much more immune to disappointment. that's because those hoping for a deal will be gone. checked out, sold. replaced by three types of strongholders. get this. first like when the debt ceiling was raised. a move that countered for a huge chunk of the markets. these people believe that some kind of deal is inevitable. they think selling now is tantamount to giving up the bottom. the second set. they feel it won't have much of an impact on the economy. they believe we won't go into recession and the whole thing is over, done. mellow drama even. they think fearmongers. and this is their group of strong holders. a little time passes, they think, hey, should be better off going over the cliff. rich will pay more of their fair shares and higher taxes on dividends. government spending sliced where it should be and and the bloated defense budget. unnecessary social programs. me? i think we aren't where we need to be yet when the it comes to abandoning a
the fiscal cliff come january and i want to be ready to climb back out with the right stock after it happens. you can't come from a given day like today, dow 107 points, hey, happy days are here again, right? this is a day where my equipment felt a little -- felt a little superfluous because we had all sorts of happy talk for a bunch of people in washington about how compromise was within reach. however, i think it's been increasingly apparent that we actually may not get a deal in time for the january deadline. something warren buffett pointed out. who am i to disagree. you don't need to change your philosophy just because we cliffed you. long term it might not matter. not all of you share his sanguine multi-year view of stocks. not one of you shares a bank account close to the size of the man that created billions of dollars of wealth. he can afford to take the long view. if we take the plunge over the two million jobs. makes everyone pay more in taxes. i don't really want to have this gear. the president said today he thought a deal could be done by christmas. the speaker of the house sai
the fiscal cliff. is there progress? is there no progress 123 are the democrats giving? have they given? the only thing given that i know is the tablet. that's what i want to spend a moment on while we bemoan is the farce that is washington. one of the worst aspects of this era where we have to hang on the word of every people who frankly aren't actually trying to make us any money, and if anything want to take it from us, is there are companies doing amazing things, soen in the interests of reminds us some companies are doing great things that can make you money, i want to celebrate the products of three terrific companies as well as their stocks, because after all this is "mad money," not mad tablets. first one of my favorses is the column that consequence taply amazes me, david pentagon, the "new york times" writer who opines brilliantly in a can't-miss column about tech products. i love this guy. today's product starts several enough, a segment of an npr-call-in seg meant that he was going to offered opinions, but to quote, all six callers had the same question -- which tablet shoul
this fiscal cliff stuff royally with your hard line positions and your ridiculous protestations that you can't compromise. here's why. we are close, very close right now within our grasps to becoming the leader of the world when it comes to technology, innovation, natural resources, and finance. you are the only thing standing in our way. you are our ball and you are our chain. like today dow rallies 40 points, s&p gained .33%, nasdaq .52%. whether it's the ceos of the honeywells or the smallest of the small. tonight's guest of lumber liquidators, they're mean-spirited debates, the pledge is not to raise taxes, it's costing this nation a once in a lifetime opportunity to reassert itself as the leader of the free world. and faster growing the repressive communist world to boot. you are in the ability to give us a deal, any deal is crushing our economy. allow me to explain. since i read @jimcramer on tw twitter people say i'm biased. i believe that the compromise that all the common sense people are looking for, some combination of spending cuts, higher taxes and pro-growth initiatives doesn't
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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